Strategies for Controlling Inflammation

by Courtney Denham July 14, 2015

Understanding the science of inflammation and chronic inflammation, especially its harmful effects on the body, has 
grown enormously over the past couple decades. Having been the subject of thousands of
 academic and medical research studies, inflammation has now been implicated in scores of 
health ailments from sore, fatigued muscles and deteriorating joints to brain dysfunction
and cardiovascular disease. The abundance of recent scientific information has spilled 
over so far into the popular media that it’s virtually impossible not to read, see, or hear
something daily about this physiological activity and the damage that can accompany it.

Inflammation is a natural and necessary component of our immune function and is also 
part of a built-in protection and healing process for most tissues. This is referred to as
acute inflammation, (because of its pronounced effect and relatively short duration), and 
it serves an important role in our health and well-being. For instance, it is part of the
 body’s defensive response to bacterial and viral infections, (such as colds, flus, cuts and
scrapes of the skin, etc.), as well as to cells that have become irreparably damaged or pre-
cancerous. Acute inflammation is marked by pain, redness, immobility, swelling and heat/
fever. Besides controlling infections, this type of inflammation also helps immobilize and 
cushion injuries such as sprains and muscle strains, allowing healing to occur more quickly
 and efficiently. Without acute inflammation, we would be far more prone to illness and
infections, and far less able to heal even minor injuries.

The problem with inflammation arises when our biochemistry gets out of balance, immune
 processes aren’t reined in, and inflammation is allowed to become continuous and long-
lasting. We refer to this as chronic inflammation. It is also known as “silent inflammation”
 because it does not have the same obvious and overt characteristics as acute inflammation.
 Chronic inflammation leads to the most deleterious and damaging effects on the body, 
among which are heart and vascular diseases, auto-immune disorders (such as rheumatoid
arthritis, Crohn’s Disease, lupus, irritable bowel syndrome [IBS], type 1 diabetes, and
 celiac disease), cerebral dysfunctions (including Alzheimer’s Disease), and many types of
 cancer. While the triggers for most of these diseases may not be fully understood, it is well
 established that inflammation is a major contributor to their progression.

It is also noteworthy that scientific studies have shown that chronic inflammation can 
be turned on by two very common health issues: 1) poor sleep quality/duration, and
 2) obesity. Poor sleep patterns have been linked conclusively with elevated levels of
 inflammation which then, in turn, increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. Obesity
 raises levels of white blood cells and other physiological mediators of inflammation, leading
to higher rates of both coronary heart disease and cancer.

While there is no “magic bullet” even in the medical or pharmaceutical arsenal, there are a
 number of proven dietary and life style practices that help substantially bring down levels of
chronic inflammation. These practices have been validated with scores of scientific studies,
 and are easily incorporated into daily practice. Clearly, as previously discussed, getting 
better quality sleep and shedding excess weight are two important steps towards controlling
inflammation. Including omega-3 fatty acids (such as fish oils) in the daily diet dramatically increases the body’s production of inflammation-fighting prostaglandins. Consuming a diet 
of antioxidant-rich, plant-based foods provides the cells with nutrients and phytochemicals
 that effectively reduce inflammation while also protecting against its damaging effects. And 
finally, supporting good circulation and a strong immune system helps the body to ward off
 infections and clear toxins that could otherwise cause inflammatory responses throughout 
the body.

CONSIDER:
1.WA Meal Replacement & Recovery Shakesfor attaining a leaner, more fit body and 
lower body weight.

2.WA Lean Lifeto boost metabolism, control appetite, and enhance the burning of 
excessive body fat.

3.WA Omega-3 Fish Oilfor supplementing these vital fatty acids each and every day.

4.WA Green Infusionfor a superior, nutrient dense source of antioxidant nutrients and
anti-inflammatory phytochemicals.

5.WA Ultimate Pre-Workoutto support proper immune system health and optimal
circulation.

6.WA Joint Advantageto support healthy joints, addressing both acute and chronic
 inflammation in these tissues.




Courtney Denham
Courtney Denham

Author



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